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The course Advanced Topics in Theoretical Physics is part of the Delta ITP, which is a joint initiative between the Universities of Leiden (UL), Utrecht (UU), and Amsterdam (UvA). The lectures are given by professors from these three universities, on topics that change every year. This is an advanced master level Delta ITP course, and it is also suitable for PhD students and postdocs.

Event details of Fall 2014 Out of equilibrium physical systems
Start date 8 September 2014
End date 15 December 2014
Time 11:00

The Fall semester course will be divided into four 4-weeks blocks for each one there are three lectures (3hrs each) and three exercise sessions (3hrs each). At the end of modules 1,2 & 4 there is an exam. Location of all lectures and exercise sessions is Utrecht (see below for details)

Summary

Module 1: Introduction to QFT in and out of equilibrium - Tomislav Prokopec (Utrecht) 
Module 2: QFT in Curved Space Times - Ben Freivogel (Amsterdam) 
Module 3: Cosmological Perturbation Theory and Quantum Effects in Inflation - Alexei Starobinsky (Landau Institute, Moskow)
Module 4: Non-equilibrium mechanics in active systems - Luca Giomi (Leiden)

 

Lectures and exercise sessions are on Monday. Note that the morning and the afternoon sessions have a different - but close enough - location:
11.00 – 12.45: MIN 208  (Minnaert Gebouw, Leuvenlaan 4, Utrecht)
13.15 - 17.15: BBG 161  (Buys Ballotgebouw, Princetonplein 5, Utrecht)

Each lecturer will in due time provide information on what is recommended literature.

Module 1: Introduction to QFT in and out of equilibrium - Tomislav Prokopec (Utrecht)

Lectures: Sep 8, Sep 15, Sep 22

Location: 11:00 – 12:45: MIN 208  | 13:15 - 17:15: BBG 161

EXAM: Sep 29

The minicourse Introduction to QFT in and out of equilibrium will consist of an introduction to the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism for out of equilibrium systems initially presented on a simple quantum mechanical system, and then generalized to quantum field theories. Thermal density matrix and two-point functions will be given as a special case. If time permits, applications to out of equilibrium problems in cosmology and in other physical systems will be discussed.

Module 2: QFT in Curved Space Times - Ben Freivogel (UvA)

Lectures: Oct 6, Oct 13, Oct 20

Location: 11:00 – 12:45: MIN 208  |13:15 - 17:15: BBG 161 

EXAM: Oct 27

The minicourse QFT in Curved Space Times will deal mostly with ambiguities in defining particles in curved space times and Bogoliubov transformations which relates different vacua. The problem of particle production will be discussed on the examples of accelerating systems in flat Minkowski space (the Unruh effect) and on black hole backgrounds (the Hawking effect). If time permits, the subtleties of renormalization (of the stress energy tensor) on curved space times will be discussed.

Module 3: Cosmological Perturbation Theory and Quantum Effects in Inflation - Alexei Starobinsky (Landau Institute, Moskow)

Lectures: Nov 10, Nov 17, Nov 24

Location: 11:00 – 12:45: MIN 208  | 13:15 - 17:15: BBG 161 

NO EXAM

The minicourse Cosmological Perturbation Theory and Quantum Effects in Inflationwill begin by quantization of a (minimally coupled) massive scalar field and massive spinor field in the spatially flat FRW metric. Next the Bogoliubov transformation and particle creation in expanding spacetimes will be discussed.  Then the quantization of scalar and tensor perturbations in the spatially flat FRW metric and calculation of perturbation spectra from inflation will be presented. If time permits, transition from quantum to stochastic classical description of the perturbations will be also included.

Module 4: Non-equilibrium mechanics in active systems - Luca Giomi (Leiden)

Lectures: Dec 1, Dec 8, Dec 15

Location: 11:00 – 12:45: MIN 208  | 13:15 - 17:15: BBG 161 

The module Non-equilibrium Mechanics in Active Systems will begin with studying collective motion, examples of which are flocking (Vicsek model). Giant density fluctuations which violate the central limit theorem will be discussed next, followed by active hydrodynamics and spontaneous flow transition in biological fluids.